Track Time, Send Direct Messages, and Update Columns

We have some new features that will help linguists and schedulers alike. Check them out:

Track Time

The time tracking add-on enables linguists to track and report the time they spend on the project.

Watch this video to see how it works:

Are you a scheduler? Your video is here. . .

Direct Messaging and File Delivery

We updated some buttons to make sure it was very clear how/when to send direct messages to project stakeholders.

All users have the ability to send direct messages to “LinguistLink Admins”, “Project Requesters”, and “Project Schedulers”. This messages go directly to these users and are not visible publicly.

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LinguistLink – Send direct messages to stakeholders

We have also added a button for linguists providing or other services to upload the file directly for the scheduler to access.

Submit-Files
Use this button to submit completed assignments to Schedulers

NOTE: Linguists should avoid delivering completed files in the “Project Discussion Board”. When they do this, it sends a notification to ALL project stakeholders (including the requester). It’s been known to create confusion and extra work — so don’t do it!

Update Columns

We have updated the visible columns in the Project View to enable quick view of information for Schedulers. They can view who requested the project, when the assignment.

TIP: You can sort information and copy/paste in a slick format to easily share information! Check it out!

Learn more by checking out our help site.

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Language Access in Health Care Creates Cultural Competence

I had the privilege this week of sitting down with some nursing students to talk about one of my favorite subjects, Language Access for health care! In the interview below, I discussed the meeting with my colleague, Jana Bitton, who is the Executive Director at Oregon Center for Nursing.

Here are a few of the things we discussed:

What are some challenges when providing language access?

As we spoke, Bitton observed that, in her experience, nurses are pretty good about using interpreters appropriately. Occasionally, a nurse may grab someone who is bi-lingual to provide interpretation for patients, not necessarily someone trained in medical translation for convenience.

There is also issues with cost, technology, and efficiency. All of these can be overcome, but are the right incentives in place?

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Do we need legislation?

Some are looking at adding legislation to make sure health systems are complying with providing translation and interpretation services.  Bitton likes the idea. She said that sometimes you do need to legislate things because there is not another reason to change behavior. However, there are some incentives built into current health care reforms in the form of a positive patient experience. The better the experience, the more funds that come to the organization. The relates directly to providing treatment and communication in the native languages of patients.

I adore about nurses. They are the people at the front line of the health care fight. They are seeing all levels of society and where the problems are. They are identifying any issues they see. Nurse-led effort to improve communication with patients is really important.

What are some current ideas that are working/not working?

There have been some efforts made to improve culturally competent discharge procedures. When discharging, you need to sit down and make sure they understand what just happened to them and what is the follow up.

In the interview, we heard about Providence Hood River Medical Center who recently realized that there were not a lot of cultural competence in place considering language, etc. They revamped the discharge procedure and made sure they had an interpreter there to ensure.

What do you think?

Do you have any thoughts about more challenges for providing language access in health care? Let us know by leaving a comment!

Listen to our Discussion Here:

Tool Tips: Track Your Projects in Linguistlink

LinguistLink was designed to enable collaboration on language-related projects for clients, project managers, and linguists. Everyone benefits when you participate!

Here are a few ways you can use LinguistLink:

Review available projects

When a project is proposed to you it will show up in the panel “available projects for you”. Be the favorite linguist by responding right away in the system!

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Start conversations to get details about the project

Got questions? It’s a great idea to get a full understanding on what you’re getting into before you commit! It’s easy to get answers by starting a conversation! Just reference the project number.

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Accept the project

Accept the project in LinguistLink. There are many reasons to do this. One of which is to build your portfolio. Potential clients can review your experience when choosing to assign the project.

Participate in the forum

If you have a question about a project, it could be others have the same question! Or, maybe you discover some new trick? Share it! You can benefit by having access to other linguists.

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Mark the task complete

Show you meet deadlines by completing the project on time in linguistlink. Also this is how those jobs show up on your profile/portfolio.

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Ask for feedback

After the project is completed, you can seek feedback from your scheduler. This will help you know what you did well and how you should improve.

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Opportunities for linguists

Here are some interesting opportunities you might be interested in. . .

 

From OHCIA

Dear Interpreter,

The Oregon Health Authority’s Office of Equity and Inclusion (OHA-OEI) is inviting you to respond to this survey because we are interested in your perspective on the working conditions for interpreters. Survey responses will be analyzed for insights on how to improve program services, laws and policies, and the working conditions for health care interpreters in Oregon.

Benefits for completing this survey

You will receive 2 continuing education units (CEU). Your CEU certificate will be emailed to you separately and will count toward the 24 hours of required CEU’s for renewing OHA issued HCI letters. The CEU credits will not count toward other national or states program requirements.

To ensure that your personal information is kept separate from your survey responses, a separate window for CEU information will open about a minute after you complete the survey. Please note that your personal information will only be used for emailing your CEU certificate and will not be shared.

The survey will end on September 30th, 2018 and the results will be published on the OHA/OEI website two months after the survey ends.

Please click this link to begin the survey (https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3643875/Health-Care-Interpreter-Satisfaction-Survey).

Thanks as always for your help.

The Sky was Falling at the Mindlink Picnic

The end of the summer picnic was an event we won’t soon forget. We met at Irving Park in Portland, Ore. Some of you may have worked on translating signs for this park earlier this year!

Unfortunately, as is typical in the Pacific Northwest, the weather didn’t really cooperate. We gathered under a large oak tree which provided a nice cover. We then enjoyed a taco bar provided by Cha! Cha! Cha!

It was all good until the breeze blew and hundreds of hard acorns pummeled us from above!

As one attendee observed:

It seemed like the start of a joke! Spanish, Italian..Israeli and Thai sat around a picnic table. then acorns start falling from the sky…

If you couldn’t make this time, be sure to catch us at a future event. Guaranteed to be unforgettable.

Check out our album:

 

 

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The Nuclear Summit and the Importance of a Trained Interpreter

The news media has recently taken particular focus on the coverage of the Trump and Kim nuclear summit of June 11, 2018. As a recent TIMES report mentions, a solid trained interpreter feels the pressure of achieving a successful meeting  of the country leaders for which they interpret.

The Times report quotes Jenna Gibson, Director of Communications at the Korea Economic Institute of America, saying, “There are very nuanced differences between words and between levels of formality in Korean.” She adds, “I don’t envy the translators at the summit, because they are going to have to make split-second decisions.”

In extreme scenarios, the interpreters’ choice of words have the power to make the difference between world peace and world war. Of course, interpreters of this caliber are highly trained in transparency and are capable of clarifying their message, should it be required.

But this brings about an important point: for any event to be successful, the interpreter must be in sync with the speaker. They must have expert knowledge on the topic being discussed. They must have a solid contextual understanding of the perception of the topic between the parties involved. This is why professional trained interpreters are so important!

Additionally, the must have nimble social skills to learn and adapt to the speakers intonation and speaking pattern in order to fully render the meaning of the speaker’s message. In other words, the interpreter must know not only the meaning behind the words spoken, but also the meaning behind how they are spoken. For example, did the speaker’s hesitant “No” mean, “No, I didn’t understand and I’m saying no because it’s a yes/no question..”, or “No, I don’t want to”. 

Often times, finding a good interpreter for your event is difficult. Most organizations don’t have the resources to learn to screen, hire, and manage an interpreter, let alone organize all the interpreter needs. That’s where language agencies come in.

A language company who has their client’s concerns in mind will support their client throughout their planning phases of the event where they’ll be using the interpreting service. Besides seeking out to fill the interpreter requests, the customer focused language company will want to be part of the planning team. It will request as much information about the event to be discussed. From general topic information, to the powerpoint presentation or speech of the speakers–the language agency will want to see it all.

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